What was the energy hog in your home on Thanksgiving day (and other holidays)?

There was a lot of cooking and eating and reheating and eating over the last few days in your home. Unless you had thanksgiving dinner at the home of your family member or friends in which case you did not have to fire up the cooker at your own place (smart move I say, it’s cheaper and you get to connect with loved ones).

So how much energy went into making that lovely thanksgiving meal of turkey (please please never eat Turducken), gravy, cornbread, ham etc? Let’s assume that your usage of energy tripled on Thanksgiving day (with family around bathing, eating and watching football games all day)

 

Baked turkey (R Gnuce - Flickr (creative commons))

Well, in Illinois

-       You used $1.50 to power that Oven all day.

-       You spent $3.72 to heat the water for all those baths

-       You spent $0.90 keeping the TV on for the football games

How about in New Jersey (currently recovering from Sandy)

-       You used slightly less than Illinois, $1.05, to power that Oven all day.

-       You spent slightly more, $5.25, to heat the water for all those baths

-       And you spent $0.93 keeping the TV on for the football games

What about in Texas? Despite the loss to RGIII

-       You used $0.87 to power that Oven all day, less than Illinois and New Jersey

-       You spent $4.35 to heat the water for all those baths (or $0.78 to keep the AC on if that was the case for you)

-       And you spent $0.57 watching the Cowboys lose the Thanksgiving day game.

And California?

-       You used $0.87 to power that Oven all day, less than Illinois and New Jersey

-       $0.87 kept the Air Conditioner on for your guests

-       $0.57, like they spent in Texas, kept the TV on all day

 

Despite the expenses, which might seem minimal but add up over the course of the year as you know, the spirit of the season is what we celebrate. As the year winds to a close we all have reason to be thankful from Illinois to New Jersey (especially in light of Superstorm Sandy) and Texas. Let’s be conscious of our energy expenses throughout the year and not just on the days when we are most likely to be shifting our usage.

All data obtained from GE Data Visualizations.

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