The Show Me State

Missouri is known as “The Show Me State” and was named after an Indian tribe called Missouri, which means “town of the large canoes”. St. Louis has a couple nicknames as well: “The Gateway to the West” and “Home of the Blues”. Speaking of the west, the “Madonna of the Trail” monument in Lexington tells the story of the brave women who helped conquer the west and is one of 12 monuments placed in every state crossed by the National Old Trails Road, the route of early settlers from Maryland to California.

Missouri is next up in our United States of Energy series, ranking number 8 in residential electricity prices averaging $9.08 Megawatts per hour. Major electric power plants include coal, hydroelectric and natural gas with coal and natural gas being the primary source of emissions in the state. The western leg of the Rockies Express natural gas pipeline passes near Kansas City before terminating northeast Missouri.

Did you know? The most powerful earthquake to strike the United States occurred in 1811, centered in New Madrid, Missouri. The quake shook more than one million square miles, and was felt as far as 1,000 miles away.

The historical earthquake is not the only record breaking natural disaster in the state of Missouri, the most destructive tornado on record occurred in Annapolis in 1925. The weather is rather unpredictable in Missouri with temperatures averaging 90 degrees Fahrenheit in July and 30 degrees Fahrenheit in January. Warsaw holds the state record low temperature of -40 degrees on February 13, 1905 and the state’s high temperature record of 118 on July 14, 1954.

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