Technology Takeover

As I was reading Ray Bradbury’s short story “There Will Come soft Rains” I had a thought: maybe Bradbury wasn’t so far off after all. According to an article by Keith Pandolfi from This Old House, “home electrocutions account for around 1,000 deaths each year in the U.S alone.” This statistic can be seen as just a number, but it is so much more than that. Every time someone has an outlet near a water source, they are putting themselves at risk. As a woman, I can think of at least five hazardous situations just by getting ready!

Not to mention, we always have to account for human error. Unfortunately, one of these errors could be detrimental to our health as well as our wallets. I have had the opportunity to witness first-hand what happens when you simply forget to clean out the lint trap in a dryer. A fire and several hotel expenses later, it became clear to me how hazardous technology and appliances can be. Yet, these are the very same things we depend on in our day-to-day lives, forgetting how easily they can be our detriment.

In a world where we communicate more with our phones and GPS systems than the person having lunch with us, the ways of human interaction are depleting drastically. Today we have ovens that can self-clean, vacuums that can do the job all by themselves, cars that can park themselves and phones that talk to us and respond to our voices. Factories have long since existed due to modern technology to cut out the middle man for efficiency. Though technology has granted us all convenience as well as knowledge, it is also something we should be cautious of to ensure it does not take over. Without caution, the very things we solely rely on can be detrimental to us.

Gridlines_Transmission and Distribution Wires

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