Land of 10,000 Lakes

Minnesota is the Land of 10,000 Lakes, and rightfully so since the state has 90,000 miles of shoreline, more than California, Florida and Hawaii combined. The Minnesota River only runs from West to East across the entire Minnesota borders. Its origin is Big Stone Lake, which is on the Minnesota-South Dakota border. The river empties into the Mississippi River near the Twin Cities.

Minnesota is the next stop in our United States Energy data series, ranked number 24 in electricity prices compared to 52 other US states averaging $10.59 Megawatts per hour. Major electric power plants include coal and natural gas, which are also the two primary sources for emissions. In fact, over two-thirds of Minnesota households use natural gas as their primary heating fuel during the state’s long, cold winters.

The temperature in Minnesota gets quite cold with temperatures as low as -60 degrees Fahrenheit. Minneapolis’ famed skyway system connecting 52 blocks, nearly five miles, of downtown makes it possible to live, eat, work and shop without going outside in the cold weather. Southdale is the oldest fully enclosed, climate-controlled mall in the United States built in 1956 and is located in Edina, Minnesota. The Metrodome is another architectural structure that is climate-controlled and is the only facility in the country to host a Super Bowl, a World Series and a NCAA Final Four Basketball Championship. Bloomington and Minneapolis are the two farthest north latitude cities to ever host a World Series game.

Did you know? The Mall of America is located in Bloomington, Minnesota and is the largest retail and entertainment complex in the U.S… and probably one of the most commonly thought of places when people mention Minnesota.

What do you think of when you hear someone mention Minnesota?

Related posts: