America’s Last Frontier

Today we are sharing visual data on America’s Last Frontier, Alaska! Ranked number 50 in residential prices compared to 52 other US states, averaging $16.26 Megawatts per hour. Major electrical power plants in Alaska are coal, natural gas, and hydroelectric with geothermal and wind renewable energy potential throughout the state of Alaska.

Emissions primarily come from coal and natural gas from the power plants, although Alaska ranks number 2 in the nation in crude oil production. In fact, Alaska accounts for 25% of the oil produced in the United States and is one of their most important revenue sources.

Alaska’s record high temperature was 100 degrees Fahrenheit in Fort Yukon, in 1915 and their record low temperature was -80 degrees Fahrenheit in Prospect Creek Camp, in 1971. Talk about drastic change in weather! Other contributors to fluctuation in energy consumption could be from Anchorage’s longest summer days containing 19 hours, 21 minutes of daylight. On the other end of the spectrum, Anchorage’s shortest winter days contain 5 hours, 28 minutes of daylight.

I wonder if people in Alaska rely on caffeine as a source of energy with the changes in daylight between summer and winter… you know, since Anchorage has more espresso stands than anywhere else in the U.S.!?!

Do we have any Alaska readers out there that can share more about this vast, fascinating and beautiful state?

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